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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 4:10 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 2:44 pm
Posts: 1
From Mepis to MX. Some of you know me from the MX Forum. About time I joined here. I appreciate greatly the help from antiX users for the MX-15 effort. Help is an understatement. MX would not be possible without you.


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 8:41 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2016 1:43 am
Posts: 63
hello richb whoopeee a first post ! avatar Icon; richb, You Can say waxing gibbous over here too. You are essential one with mx too. yes.


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 6:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2009 9:48 pm
Posts: 26
As a long time linux user, and distro hopper, I've generally narrowed down my favorites over the years and keep coming back to either anitX, PCLinuxOS, Manjaro or Slackware.

With each new release of antiX, I always burn a disc and try it out and I'm always amazed at the quality of work that goes into making it such a great OS. It never fails to disappoint.

Kudos, and keep up the good work!


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 10:22 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2016 2:40 pm
Posts: 1
Skipping lightly over BSD 4.x in the '80s, then Mark Williams (and some premature Linux attempts) in the '90s, it was an early Knoppix that got us going initially - and then we bought a boxed copy of SuSE 10, with tech support. That helped us get our OpenGL aircraft simulations to run fast enough on a PC that could no longer quite do the job under XP. Well worth it, and what a bonus in maintainability.
I started converting friends and rellies to Linux to prevent my spending social events de-crufting their (literally) poxy Windows systems whilst they had fun...
Then came the distro-hopping!
'Buntu Breezy, and a succession of Xubuntu/Kubuntu/Lubuntu/Geobuntu/Fluxbuntu etc until the Canonical structural changes came and borked them for us...
Had much fun with Puppy, Tiny Core, and of course Knoppix - always reliable.
eLive was gorgeous fun, but would self-immolate itself quite reliably...
Fluxbuntu faded away and led us to Mint Fluxbox (sadly missed when it went) and then on to LMDE, briefly.
LMDE was so very good when it worked, but...
(see XKCD 349 : http://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/349:_Success )

Then Bodhi 1.0 appeared and ran alongside two trusted LTS Xubuntu installations - using far less RAM with higher reliability and a slicker desktop - so we jumped in and brought the long tail of relatives, friends and acquaintances along too, along with their RAM-deficient hardware and puny CPUs.
But I really prefer to fully install and configure Bodhi for my average new user, and sadly, Knoppix has gone a bit funny lately and one can't just hand out a disk or stick to new friends as one used to.

So here we are!
So far so excellent!
Still have the posse of rellies etc, but the generations have moved on... Sometimes I'm calling them for support, now.
We still need a fairly complete distro that one can hand out on a CD/DVD or USB that will delight the newcomer, and Antix has done us proud since the excellent Neil Mohr at Linux Format answered our plea for a replacement DVD to go with our copy of LXF216.
Always respected Antix in the past, but the occasion for in-depth testing had never arisen.

Respect, and copious thanks for this beautifully balanced and highly configurable Linux distribution. Ben


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:30 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 3:44 am
Posts: 4023
Location: Pecos, Texas
Welcome one and all.
AntiX has become my go to system for big and small.
I'm just a scooter tramp with a GED.
But AntiX Linux has set me free.
I run it like I stole it.
Fast and hard.
I run it till the wheels fall off.
Till brain cells get scarred.

I'm a poet.
But nobody knows it.
But my feet show it.
Because.
They are LongFellows.

_________________
Linux Registered User # 475019
Linux at Home courses
How to Search for AntiX solutions to your problems


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2016 8:20 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2012 9:46 pm
Posts: 760
Location: Surrey/Hants Border UK
I've been using it for quite a while now, & can't see me ever using any other Linux distro. :)

I do dabble with OpenBSD though. ;)

(I've been Linux & BSD since 1999)

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Linux (& BSD) since 1999.
(Now also ukuleles & harmonicas.)


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2016 7:42 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:15 am
Posts: 48
Location: Hollywood, FL, USA
I started with Ubuntu several years ago but gave it up and went back to Windows. Recently my PC died. I bought a new one for dirt cheap, but it didn't have Windows. It came preinstalled with Ubuntu. However Ubuntu was to heavy for it, so I switched to Lubuntu. I wanted something even lighter so I did some research and settled on antiX.

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Intel Compute Stick with Atom z3735f 1.3 GHz, 1 GB Ram, AntiX 16 64 bit


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2016 6:48 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:52 am
Posts: 1
Short version, I was sent here by systemD. I have been using linux since 2000(red hat) and have tried many different distros over the years, SuSE, Ubuntu, Kali. A few years ago I settled into Debian Wheezy. It was my favorite distro up to that point and I stayed with it. But when Jessie came out loaded with systemD I began looking for an alternative. I tried Slackware but it seemed geared more for professionals than end users like myself. I am really liking AntiX so far. It feels like Debian to me, only better. It is lighter, faster. I have an old laptop so a light OS is important to me.


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 12:26 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 30, 2016 8:17 pm
Posts: 1
Got here from the antiX16 distro, auto connected to site from firefox homepage

Just saying 'Hi!'

New to both Linux and antiX
Liking the look of antiX 16 - familiar look when crossing over from the M$ platform

KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 1:20 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 10:57 pm
Posts: 98
I keep calling myself a Windows Migrant, but I reckon I've been a Linux full timer long enough to shrug myself out from under that millstone.

Masinick might be the oldest on the train, but I'm no spring chicken at 49. I started using PC compatibles in 1990 at University. I cut my teeth on Windows 3.x and DOS 5. I word processed my dissertation on a DOS 6.2 / Windows 3.1 shelf standing Oliveti. I built my first PC in 1994 an AMD DX4 100 with 2MB RAM and in our down time post graduation we played Doom II, X-Wing and Sim City.

I learned a lot of crap trying to get games to run. First using DOS utilities like memmaker to allocate UMBs and then manual sorting my config.sys and autoexec.bat files to control what loaded into upper memory, when and where. Creating startup menu's to control the loading of components (like the CD ROM drive) for different applications. Due to all this feckin' around...I once deleted the C:\Windows and C:\Windows\System folders and restored files, one by one, until Windows worked again...I started getting paid to support Windows PCs in 1999. Now I'm a Windows Engineer.

The closest I come to Windows at home is a VM that runs Windows 10 and my graphically cutting edge games. I can do this by passing a second graphics card through to the VM...I'm lucky if I know half of what I'm doing before I start.

I started running 'dual' boot PCs in 1996 with a set up of Windows 95 / OS/2 Warp and Slackware. I didn't try weaning myself off Windows until 2002 when I started running SUSE with KDE. Some applications (games in particular) caused problems and I flitted back and forth until 2004 when I dropped a copy of Ubuntu with Gnome2, even though I always thought KDE was very Windows DE-like, I just clicked with Gnome2. I also discovered Cedega and tried and succeeded in running Windows games in Linux. Since then I've been exposed to some of the back and forth between the open source Wine that proprietary Cedega was based on and pressed the ejector seat button on Cedega and haven't looked back. Wine is a really superb piece of work.

In 2011 I was an Ubuntu user to my core. I'd played with other distros but Ubuntu was simply easier and slicker, why use anything else? Then 11:04 dropped. Unity? Really...why have Ubuntu turned my PC into a touchscreen optimised, mobile phone environment. Should I toss my mouse down the garden? Nah, I'm off to Mint.

Having be so unceremoniously evicted from Ubuntu, but having become rather handy with apt and synaptic I started looking at Debian and wondering if I could crack this tricky nut. Bollocks could I get half my apps works, never mind Wine...the Debian way might be the right way (YMMV) or the best way, but it wasn't the Ubuntu way (feckin' good job too).

After buying a Acer Aspire One netbook I discovered what gutless, low power computing could be like so I ripped out the laughable Windows OS on it and kept trying out "lightweight distros". Puppy is an interesting toy, but it looks a bit funny and configuring the interface is a PITA. I got annoyed with many so called lightweight distros like Lubuntu and Xubuntu! Light on functionality only. Unity is a fat lumbering pig, so yeah, ripping it out and installing Xfce makes it run a shade faster but this does not a lightweight distro make. I finally found antiX. It made my netbook fly. I can actually launch Firefox in less than thirty seconds! It runs vlc and I can watch videos. That's all I use the netbook for.

I started a project to reduce the weight of the distro and DE so I could free all my resources for things like gaming. Wine is fantastic but it's no real substitute for native Linux games and there are sadly still so few of them. Getting Wine as many free resources as possible became an obsession. If it ran and was listed in the ps aux output I wanted to know what it was and if I didn't need it I wanted to rip it out. I got so fed up with this stripping process that when I read about antiX Core I knew I'd found exactly what I was looking for.

I consider a DE with the heft of Xfce4 an indulgence, but I can afford it. It looks great and works with a satisfying simplicity and gives me access (in few clicks) to everything I want. For everything else there is the cli, apt and ceni. It takes less time to install every single OS component I require than it does hacking a distro to bits and trying to get the 'dependency hell storm' working at the end of that process. Starting with Core and pulling in X.org, Xfce4 and my selection of apps is more satisfying and efficient. And systemd free if you want.

Anti and the team are some of my favourite people in the world. Loving your work!

_________________
~ AMD FX 8350 Black Edition | Sabertooth FX 990 r1.0 | Nvidia GTX 750 Ti 2 GB GDDR5 | Nvidia GTX 760 2 GB GDDR5 ~
~Acer Aspire One ZG5 | Atom N270 | 8.9 in 1024×600 TFT LCD | 8 GB SSD | 512 MB RAM ~


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 1:56 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2008 6:02 am
Posts: 1100
Location: Clinton Township, Michigan
spaceman wrote:
I keep calling myself a Windows Migrant, but I reckon I've been a Linux full timer long enough to shrug myself out from under that millstone.

Masinick might be the oldest on the train, but I'm no spring chicken at 49. I started using PC compatibles in 1990 at University. I cut my teeth on Windows 3.x and DOS 5. I word processed my dissertation on a DOS 6.2 / Windows 3.1 shelf standing Oliveti. I built my first PC in 1994 an AMD DX4 100 with 2MB RAM and in our down time post graduation we played Doom II, X-Wing and Sim City.

I learned a lot of crap trying to get games to run. First using DOS utilities like memmaker to allocate UMBs and then manual sorting my config.sys and autoexec.bat files to control what loaded into upper memory, when and where. Creating startup menu's to control the loading of components (like the CD ROM drive) for different applications. Due to all this feckin' around...I once deleted the C:\Windows and C:\Windows\System folders and restored files, one by one, until Windows worked again...I started getting paid to support Windows PCs in 1999. Now I'm a Windows Engineer.

The closest I come to Windows at home is a VM that runs Windows 10 and my graphically cutting edge games. I can do this by passing a second graphics card through to the VM...I'm lucky if I know half of what I'm doing before I start.

I started running 'dual' boot PCs in 1996 with a set up of Windows 95 / OS/2 Warp and Slackware. I didn't try weaning myself off Windows until 2002 when I started running SUSE with KDE. Some applications (games in particular) caused problems and I flitted back and forth until 2004 when I dropped a copy of Ubuntu with Gnome2, even though I always thought KDE was very Windows DE-like, I just clicked with Gnome2. I also discovered Cedega and tried and succeeded in running Windows games in Linux. Since then I've been exposed to some of the back and forth between the open source Wine that proprietary Cedega was based on and pressed the ejector seat button on Cedega and haven't looked back. Wine is a really superb piece of work.

In 2011 I was an Ubuntu user to my core. I'd played with other distros but Ubuntu was simply easier and slicker, why use anything else? Then 11:04 dropped. Unity? Really...why have Ubuntu turned my PC into a touchscreen optimised, mobile phone environment. Should I toss my mouse down the garden? Nah, I'm off to Mint.

Having be so unceremoniously evicted from Ubuntu, but having become rather handy with apt and synaptic I started looking at Debian and wondering if I could crack this tricky nut. Bollocks could I get half my apps works, never mind Wine...the Debian way might be the right way (YMMV) or the best way, but it wasn't the Ubuntu way (feckin' good job too).

After buying a Acer Aspire One netbook I discovered what gutless, low power computing could be like so I ripped out the laughable Windows OS on it and kept trying out "lightweight distros". Puppy is an interesting toy, but it looks a bit funny and configuring the interface is a PITA. I got annoyed with many so called lightweight distros like Lubuntu and Xubuntu! Light on functionality only. Unity is a fat lumbering pig, so yeah, ripping it out and installing Xfce makes it run a shade faster but this does not a lightweight distro make. I finally found antiX. It made my netbook fly. I can actually launch Firefox in less than thirty seconds! It runs vlc and I can watch videos. That's all I use the netbook for.

I started a project to reduce the weight of the distro and DE so I could free all my resources for things like gaming. Wine is fantastic but it's no real substitute for native Linux games and there are sadly still so few of them. Getting Wine as many free resources as possible became an obsession. If it ran and was listed in the ps aux output I wanted to know what it was and if I didn't need it I wanted to rip it out. I got so fed up with this stripping process that when I read about antiX Core I knew I'd found exactly what I was looking for.

I consider a DE with the heft of Xfce4 an indulgence, but I can afford it. It looks great and works with a satisfying simplicity and gives me access (in few clicks) to everything I want. For everything else there is the cli, apt and ceni. It takes less time to install every single OS component I require than it does hacking a distro to bits and trying to get the 'dependency hell storm' working at the end of that process. Starting with Core and pulling in X.org, Xfce4 and my selection of apps is more satisfying and efficient. And systemd free if you want.

Anti and the team are some of my favourite people in the world. Loving your work!


There is someone I know well on these forums named Bill - "julian516". He's got me beat on the "senior scene". I have more years working with UNIX (1982) and Linux (1995), but Bill has built up an excellent level of experience, simply by reading, experimenting, comparing, and choosing what he prefers. Like me, he tends to prefer Debian-based systems and he enjoys using distributions in the MEPIS, MX, and antiX families.

He's used systems pre-built with Linux on them, such as the System76, but he generally replaces what comes on them with systems suited to his interests and tastes. From what I can recall, he enjoys digital photography, so that will frequently influence which extra software he adds to his systems.

As for anti and the team, you're right on. There are a lot of capable, helpful individuals from a wide variety of experience, also having a variety of interests and views. I find, in spite of a wide diversity in what we like and prefer, for the most part, people are civil and get along very well in this group. Rarely do I see people nit pick at their personal interests, whether they agree with them or not, and that's another reason why I enjoy this team, this group, and this software. I've found people to be respectful of one another here, and so in addition to good software, I've experienced good manners here, and that matters to me. In some other places, if you differ with someone politically, socially, or in any other way, you get attacked; I've not witnessed that here, so diversity seems to be welcome, and that's a good way to treat others.

_________________
Brian Masinick
Favorite distros: antiX, MX, Debian Sid


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 12:07 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:46 pm
Posts: 3
Location: Belgium
Hello,

The path I followed had many curves:

80's: Commodere 128 (used it more than a decade)
90's: Win 3.11 (with disks), Win 95, NT and XP - Red Hat, SuSE and Corel Linux
00's: Windows XP, VIsta and Corel Linux (not for long)
10's: Ubuntu Studio 10, 12, 14 and 16, KXStudio 12 and 14, TangoStudio based on Ubuntu 12, io GNU/Linux 16 and in search of a better base to build a music studio with daw and tools ...
---o antiX 16 o---

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Morneco Tenebro
. : | T:me :s n°where, :nbetween we |:ve. | : .


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2017 3:44 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 3:09 pm
Posts: 3
I messed with MEPIS some years ago, even installed it on several friends' pcs to start a new life beyond XP. s I recall it was MEPIS 3.4.3. Cool stuff! Now, being inflicted with W7 I started looking for MEPIS again and found MX-16 and antiX-16. Just installed antiX 16 64 on an HP laptop that we had given up on. Brand new 1TB drive but W7 was so bloated it kept overheating the CPU. LOL! Loving it so far, but confused, as usual.


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2017 7:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 10:32 pm
Posts: 5
I can tell whit precision!

Almost seven years ago, i have a Toshiba Satellite 1900-102 (still whit me!) and a friend called Ainus (is a nickname) dare me to wipeout the Windows Xp and install Debian. So... I do it ^^ i install Debian whit LXDE. After that i try antiX. Everything work out of the box except the PCMCIA wifi. Whit time other portable PC come, other Desktop PC... Lubuntu is what i usualy use... But time to time i burn a copy of AntiX and try it.

This time is final. I have a nice desktop PC, but i'm trying use a low power PC whit a VIA C7 processor. And it's WONDERFULL. I use that small PC for the usual stuff and AntiX do the BEST.

Thank you very much for antiX and keep the excellent work.


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 Post subject: Re: How did you get here?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 8:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 6:59 pm
Posts: 3
I got to Antix from a Linux magazine DVD, so really it was a lucky accident, but I've been looking for a lightweight distro for an old laptop for a while now. I'd tried various (allegedly) lightweight versions of Ubuntu but they were all sluggish on this particular machine. Along comes Antix and - boom - feels like a new PC!

Don't get me wrong, I like Ubuntu on my "main" machine - the Mate version as I don't especially like Unity, but my older "spare" machine just wouldn't perform at a reasonable level with Ubuntu, Xubuntu etc. Now it has a new lease of life :)


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